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The Tale of Two Brothers

The Tale of Two Brothers
The tribe of Kitoa has long been guided under the teachings of Atleyia, embodied by a large tree at the village's center. After years of transcribing these teachings, much has been lost in translation, resulting in corruption in the village. Years of unjust exiles of many of Kitoa’s constituents as a result of this corruption culminates in the banishing of Hakan at the age of 6. Atleyia communicates with Cerulean, Hakan’s mother, and explains that with this exile, a seed will be planted that will either cure corruption within Kitoa, or will see the falling of Atleyia’s teachings forever.

With the outcome of The Tale of Two Brothers, we want to leave the audience with a few  thoughts about organized religion. In the story, there is a society whose views are centered  around their religion. While faith is something that guides many people through life, the story  shows that it shouldn’t be followed blindly. The Tale of Two Brothers shines light on the fact  that many religions are built on the foundation of good intentions, such as love, but are tainted  and misinterpreted along the way. It also shows the corruption behind fundamentalist religion  that has an emphasis on authority and superiority of its teachings. Within the story, the different characters represent different takes on religion. The two brothers at the center of the story are  forced to play opposing roles because of their clashing morals and views on religion. One  brother, Hakan, was exiled at a young age for a simple mistake that was blown out of proportion  and the other brother, Aleki, is the protector of the tribe. Aleki is raised by his mother and the  elder of the tribe, Cerulean, while Hakan is taken in by a tribe of exiles and raised by Maleko, a  previous council member in their society. Their very different experiences shape their views on  religion and society and guide them throughout the story.