Steelcase funds work to create an active learning space where students and faculty collaborate

>May 25, 2018

Steelcase funds work to create an active learning space where students and faculty collaborate

Steelcase funds work to create an active learning space where students and faculty collaborate

A corporate grant will fund efforts to transform an existing Virginia Tech classroom into a living laboratory to support learning strategies that promote engagement, creativity, and collaboration, while helping researchers better understand patterns of active learning.

The educational arm of Steelcase, a company that produces office furniture and architectural and technology products, awarded one of its Active Learning Center grants to a team led by Timothy Baird, assistant professor of geography in the College of Natural Resources and Environment and senior fellow for the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology. Out of more than 1,000 proposals submitted, Virginia Tech was one of only 16 education institutions across the nation to receive the funding.

Steelcase funds work to create an active learning space where students and faculty collaborate
Timothy Baird, assistant professor of geography in the College of Natural Resources and Environment and senior fellow for the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology, engages with students in the classroom. Photo courtesy of Virginia Pellington.

 

Baird will lead efforts to transform a classroom into an active learning space to promote engagement and creativity and to assess student and faculty experiences and learning outcomes. Active learning strategies help students take an active role in the learning process and prepare them to demonstrate course concepts, analyze arguments, and apply ideas to real-world situations.

Addressing concerns from education, intelligent infrastructure, human-building interactions, and computer vision disciplines, the project will support faculty who embrace active learning strategies and work to shift students’ classroom expectations.

Home to the Center for Environmental Applications of Remote Sensing (CEARS), Room 217 in Cheatham Hall was designed over 20 years ago as a space for instruction, outreach, and collaborative research using remote sensing to better understand human-environment interactions and dynamics on the Earth’s surface.

There will be rear subwoofer speakers in addition to a variety of overhead audio channels.

Read MoreRead More