Computational thinking will help students become better scientists

>December 18, 2015

Computational thinking will help students become better scientists

Computational thinking will help students become better scientistsComputational thinking will help students become better scientists

A team of researchers led by a Virginia Tech faculty member has received $1.25 million from the National Science Foundation to introduce computational approaches to help students learn chemistry in an environment that encourages scientific discussion.

Led by Deborah Tatar, a professor of computer science in the College of Engineering, a member of the Center for Human-Computer Interaction, and a fellow with the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology, the researchers will embark on a two-year project to familiarize students with the ways computational thinking can interact with and deepen the understanding of chemistry.

Felicia Etzkorn, a professor of bioorganic chemistry in Virginia Tech’s College of Science, is part of the team, along with two faculty members from the University of Texas at Austin’s College of Education — Victor Sampson and Stephanie Rivale. The project will involve four teachers in the Austin, Texas area.

Tatar talked about ways to integrate computing with science, technology, engineering, and math education at a National Science Foundation conference, "Next Generation STEM Learning," earlier this month in Washington, D.C.

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