ICAT Instrument Maker Camp

Date: 
Monday, July 17, 2017 to Thursday, July 20, 2017

ICAT Instrument Maker Camp for Middle School Students

Campers will work in teams to use upcycled materials, computer programs, electronic sensors, and microprocessors to prototype and build entirely new musical instruments. No prior music, programming, or making skills required. At the end of the workshop, campers will perform with their instruments.

This program is part of the ICAT research portfolio. For more information, see the research description found at http://www.icat.vt.edu/content/icat-outreach-program-forms.

For camp, you’ll need to complete the

  • Blanket Assent Form for ages 12-16 (beginning readers may use the 5-12 one)
  • Parent permission and consent – so that we may observe and ask parents about their observations and interactions with campers
  • Code of Conduct
  • Health history and emergency info

 

Location: Moss Arts Center. Check in and out in the Grand Lobby.

Date and time: Monday, July 17 to Thursday, July 20 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM Parents should plan to attend the final concert and presentation at 2:45 Thursday.

Campers’ ages: Middle school

Cost: $150 per camper. A limited number of partial scholarships are available. Contact us at pnewbill@vt.edu with questions.

Food: Campers are responsible for bringing their own lunches, beverages, and snacks each day.

Maximum # of campers: 20

Deadlines: Registration opens March 31. Registration closes when camp is full or June 30. A waiting list will be created if needed.

Transportation: Parents/guardians are responsible for transporting campers to and from camp. The full camp program takes place at the Moss Arts Center.

Registration Registration opens March 31.

  • Pay registration fees at [CPE link]
  • Provide the name and email address for a teacher, coach, or youth program leader who can provide a recommendation
  • Additional registration and research forms are required at the beginning of camp. These can be downloaded from http://www.icat.vt.edu/content/icat-outreach-program-forms. For camp, parents and kids need to work together to complete the
  • Blanket Assent Form for ages 12-16 (beginning readers may use the 5-12 one)
  • Parent permission and consent – so that we may observe and ask parents about their observations and interactions with campers
  • Code of Conduct
  • Health history and emergency info

Camp Leadership Program: Maker Camp alumni who have aged out of the program may be eligible to be youth facilitators. Additional training is required. Contact the camp director if you are interested.

ICAT Instrument Maker Camp for K12 Teachers

Are you interested in

  • exploring how to pull the arts and design into STEM?
  • seeing how the arts can be used to contextualize your SOL content?
  • identifying ways to engage students with multiple interests?
  • learning with students and from students?
  • spending time being creative earning 3 units of continuing education credit? 

Due to continuing success of our student instrument maker camp*, we are once again giving teachers the opportunity to have this experience alongside students! Come and see what the buzz is all about. We will explore design, discovery, and creativity as we combine computer science, engineering, the arts, and design. No previous experience in any of these areas is needed. Join us in a safe, environment where risk-taking and failure are encouraged.

Instrument Maker camp will be simultaneously offered to teachers and students this summer.

What does that mean for you? You will:

  • see our methods in action as you experience them first hand.
  • observe and interact with students experiencing the same opportunity.
  • take advantage of having students in your group to ask them questions about their own learning, how they take risks, and what failure looks like to them.
  • reflect on potential applications for your classroom and curriculum and receive direct feedback from your “users” (real students).
  • experience ambiguity, uncertainty, and failure in a safe and supportive environment.

Teacher-campers will work in teams to use upcycled materials, computer programs, electronic sensors, and microprocessors to prototype and build entirely new musical instruments. At the end of the workshop, campers will perform with their instruments.

This program is part of the ICAT research portfolio. For more information, see the research description found at http://www.icat.vt.edu/content/icat-outreach-program-forms.

Location: Moss Arts Center. Check in and out in the Grand Lobby.

Date and time: Monday, July 17 to Thursday, July 20 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

A final concert and presentation is at 2:45 Thursday.

Teacher-campers eligible: Any K12 teacher in formal or informal learning environments is invited to register.

Cost: $230 per teacher-camper includes lunches and continuing education credits

Maximum # of teacher-campers: 10

Deadlines: Registration opens March 31. Registration closes when camp is full or June 30. A waiting list will be created if needed.

Registration

Registration opens March 31.

  • Pay registration fees at [CPE link]
  • Additional registration and research forms are required at the beginning of camp. These can be downloaded from http://www.icat.vt.edu/content/icat-outreach-program-forms.
  • For camp, you’ll need to complete the
  • Adult/parent permission and consent
  • Health history and emergency info

What kind of teacher is the camp designed for?

We fully admit and embrace that our camp is not designed for any specific group of teachers (i.e., elementary science teachers or high school math teachers). We recognize the power in integrative learning and collaborative problem solving. We believe in giving learners the time, space, and permission to think and create. You’ll have the opportunity to explore, learn, and reflect in this kind of classroom.

I teach 7th grade language arts. How does this camp help me?

The camp is a model of a different kind of classroom. External motivation comes from a final public show instead of a grade. Cooperation, collaboration, and process skills are valued as much as the final products of the camp. The camp will introduce you to cutting edge technologies and thought processes for combining the old with the new.

Parts of the camp directly address English SOLs 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, and 7.4. Oral verbal and nonverbal communication are major skills that are developed and used in the camp experience. To develop media literacy skills, campers will draft, edit, and publish a documentary film of their process during the camp. Campers will learn specialized vocabulary of music, math, and computer programming.

I teach art/music at the middle school level. How does this camp help me?

As we embrace a more integrative exploration of our creative, artistic nature, let’s focus on ways to infuse science, design, and technology into our lessons. Visual Arts Standard 8.2 outlines the development of art and the principles of design. Goals are to select and use art media, subject matter, and symbols for expression and communication; demonstrate understanding of and apply the elements of art and the principles of design and the ways they are used in the visual arts; solve visual arts problems with originality, flexibility, fluency, and imagination. A related standard is the Mathematics Standard 8.3, which identifies solving practical problems involving rational numbers, percents, ratios, and proportions.

Music Standard MS.9 identifies and compares relationships between music and other disciplines. As students demonstrate relationships between music, history, aesthetics, they also explore wavelength, frequency, speed, resonance, and the technological applications of sound established in Science Standard PS.8.

I teach high school Biology. How does this camp help me?

This camp is designed to encourage exploration and experience in working, safely, in a collaborative design space. Similar to a science laboratory, campers will use sophisticated technologies found in many of our STEM and FabLabs. This camp will introduce and refine lab safety, strategies for communication in shared spaces, and identify appropriate tools and materials needed to reach goals. In addition, through the process documentation and critique segments, campers will gain experience in developing effective presentations to include in defense of their design decisions, explanation of failures, and description of how those failures contributed to persistence through a challenge.